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The End is only the beginning. The Journey Continues…

I am sad that this semester is at an end.  I looked forward to the EC&I 831 Tuesday night Zoom sessions and catching up with my classmates/colleagues on Twitter each day.  I’m sure the Twitter relationships will continue, but I am going to miss having our weekly session!  It would be fabulous to just open my classroom door and go visit these amazing folks to see what they’re doing with their students and collaborate on a more frequent basis.  Our PLN has been an incredible gift the past few months.

 

Continuing my journey

One thing that I know will not be coming to an end is my major learning project, because there is simply no end to my journey for truth and reconciliation.  There are important milestones to reach within the journey I have undertaken as an educator; what I have learned thus far has changed my approach to learning and teaching.  Since deciding to undertake this journey (which I blogged about in Can I be a Witness? and Starting a Journey of Reconciliation) I have immersed myself in history and witnessing all I can possibly witness within the time I have available.

Here, then, is a brief summary of my learning journey…

Reading

I re-read large sections of Shingwauk’s Vision: A History of Native Residential Schools by J.R. Miller and A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System 1879-1996 by John S. Milloy – books that I read years ago during my undergrad degree.  Simply put, I have found these two books to be quite an extensive history of the Residential School System in Canada, and they are excellent primary sources for any questions I have (or my students have) about the schools.

I also read a variety of novels and plays and began incorporating them into my teaching.  Some of my new favourites:

I’m also reading Empire of Wild by Cherie Dimaline… and it is likely to be on my favourties list in the near future.

Enrolling

I enrolled in a MOOC through the University of Alberta entitled Indigenous Canada.  I have completed 10 of the 12 modules (13 out of 15 course hours) and am really looking forward to finishing the course.   In my research and my curation of content for my Wakelet collections, I’ve found another MOOC through the University of Toronto that I intend to enroll in for next semester entitled Aboriginal Worldviews and Education.  I’m very thankful for the Open courses that are allowing me to learn so much from the comfort of my home without high tuition charges.

Collaborating

I joined a Truth and Reconciliation PLC (Professional Learning Community) in my school division, thanks to Curtis Bourassa and our FNMI consultant Raquel Oberkirsch.  We met for a full day of sharing and working together, with more meetings to come over the course of the year.  We are, collectively, working with resources and developing connections to curricula.  The high school (grades 10-12) teachers in the PLC have been tasked with examining the Treaty Outcomes and deciding which course(s) they best fit with to ensure they are thoroughly and respectfully embedded in appropriate content areas to provide meaningful treaty education.

 

Witnessing 

There were two major cultural events that had a large impact on me during the past few months – the Jeremy Dutcher concert on October 19 and the chamber opera, Missing, on November 8.  I blogged about the Jeremy Dutcher concert in Enrolling in MOOCs and Enjoying Live Music and discussed the opera in Where are they? MMIWG.

A new thing I learned is the making of Tobacco Ties or Prayer Ties.  Raquel (our FNMI consultant) demonstrated how to assemble the ties, discussed the colours of cloth and string, and we talked about the preferences a knowledge keeper or elder may have surrounding these.  The basics of making Tobacco Ties can be found HERE.  The most important piece to remember is that the making of Tobacco Ties or Prayer Ties should be done with reverence and respect, with good thoughts for the intended recipient.

Tobacco Ties
An example of Tobacco Ties

 

Another treasure I found is the movie The Grizzlies, based on a true story.  In a small Arctic town struggling with the highest suicide rate in North America, a group of Inuit students’ lives are transformed when they are introduced to the sport of lacrosse. (source)  With suicides among First Nations in the recent news, the movie is an excellent vehicle to get students to think about this critical issue.  The movie is powerful and moving.  Besides being an excellent film, the story about how the film was made is also inspiring.  Everyone involved in the project was committed to portraying the story in as authentic a manner as possible, from choosing the setting to casting the actors.  (To learn more about the making of the movie, see the article HERE).

 

Meeting

With my love of writing and stories, which I’ve discussed in numerous blog posts over the last few years, I was thrilled to meet and listen to Ernie Louttit.

“Indian Ernie” – a name he was given on the streets – is the author of three books.  In his talk with our students, he described how:

  • he joined the military and became a police officer despite being on his way to the bar!
  • language is power and he has a huge love for learning.
  • to be a good law enforcement officer, one must be a good story teller and have the ability to use words to recreate and tell the story about an incident.
  • being able to communicate effectively is important for ALL future goals and career aspirations.

As one of the key figures in seeing that justice was served in the Neil Stonechild case and who was instrumental in bringing down the “big guys” in the solvent huffing epidemic in Saskatoon, Ernie stated that he “doesn’t care who gets the credit, just so long as the job gets done.”  He challenged our students to “Be a Leader every day!  Encourage the people around you!”

 

Curating

Learning about Wakelet has been an absolute game changer for me both personally and professionally.  Saving tweets, teaching ideas, resources, articles to read, coaching ideas, Instagram posts… I have 25 collections right now with over 366 bookmarks.  I’ve downloaded the app on my mobile devices and added the extension to my Google browsers on each computer I use.

The collections I curated to document and enhance my learning project are all set to “Public” and can be copied for anyone wishing to use the resources I have collected.  I am adding to the collections as I discover new resources that I can use with students in my classes and would love to have contributors to my collections – please reach out to me if you would like to be a contributor to any of my collections and I would gladly add you!

Here are the links to each of the Wakelets that relate to my learning project:

It looks like a long list, but quite honestly, I feel like I have only scratched the surface and there is so much left to learn.  But, I have a lifetime in which to learn and I know I will continue to add to the collections as part of my ongoing journey.

 

Teaching

“When we know better, we do better” as the saying goes.  I don’t know if I’m a “master” teacher yet or if I will ever get there.  I still make a LOT of mistakes, lessons sometimes flop, I lose track of time, my pacing isn’t great sometimes … but I’m pretty good at learning!

The truths I have learned and the amazing stories I have witnessed over the past couple months while on the journey of my learning project will be shared with my classmates, my students, my colleagues, and anyone who wishes to use my Wakelets.  I hope that the collections can teach others and help them with their own learning journey.

As an educator committed to truth and reconciliation, I will use what I have learned to aid in building students’ capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect.

Thank you for this opportunity to learn.  

 

P.S. Visit me on Wakelet!

The End of a Journey: Summary of Learning

The making of my Summary…

Maybe because I’m a bit nuts, I have always challenged myself to use a new tool for the Summary of Learning projects I’ve done for my grad classes with Alec.  This go-around was no exception.  I narrowed my choices down to two: Genial.ly and Sutori. Ultimately I chose Sutori because it had the least amount of options for creation!  Both can be used as presentation tools… but Genial.ly has WAY more capabilities than just a presentation tool and I did not want to fall into a rabbit hole.  Check it out for yourself!

Because I knew I wanted a way to include links to some of the content but still needed a way to share my learning in a “watchable” format for class, I “presented” my Summary of Learning on Sutori and captured it using Screencastify.  The link to the presentation on Sutori is here –SUMMARY OF LEARNING PRESENTATION.   When you view it as a presentation, you will notice the arrow beside some text.  Click on the arrow and it will open a hyperlinked site for you. 

The one link that I think everyone needs to explore is Top Tools for Learning 2019.  We have talked about or used a variety of these within our class this semester, but some of them are new to me and I am looking forward to exploring them.

As mentioned in my Summary and on Twitter, I curated a Wakelet of some of the Ed Tech we used this semester in class – check it out HERE.  I’d love to have more contributors – shoot me a message!  (and yes, I know I have a grammar error in my Tweet.  Ugh.)

As I mentioned, I used Screencastify to capture the entire presentation as well as to record a Star Wars Intro Crawler I created using part of our course syllabus.  Unfortunately this got cut from the presentation because my video became too long!  So, for your viewing pleasure, here you go!

 

 

A couple more tools:

I used Bitmoji for the cute little avatar likenesses – Bitmoji Kyla is way more put together than Real Life Kyla this last week, that’s for sure!

Bitmoji Image

 

and I used Canva to create two of the images in the presentation:

The Big Four – EC&I 831
Social Medium Exploration

 

Those are the highlights!  I hope you enjoy my summary of learning as much as I enjoyed my time in class this semester!

KYLA’S TOP TAKEAWAY from class:  Wakelet.  It has changed how I organize information in all aspects of my life.  Seriously.

 

Riding the #wakeletwave

 

I humbly present my Summary of Learning for EC&I 831.

Disclaimer:  I have a terrible cold and my nose is red and runny… hence, no webcam views of me.  You’re welcome.