Category Archives: edtech

The End is only the beginning. The Journey Continues…

I am sad that this semester is at an end.  I looked forward to the EC&I 831 Tuesday night Zoom sessions and catching up with my classmates/colleagues on Twitter each day.  I’m sure the Twitter relationships will continue, but I am going to miss having our weekly session!  It would be fabulous to just open my classroom door and go visit these amazing folks to see what they’re doing with their students and collaborate on a more frequent basis.  Our PLN has been an incredible gift the past few months.

 

Continuing my journey

One thing that I know will not be coming to an end is my major learning project, because there is simply no end to my journey for truth and reconciliation.  There are important milestones to reach within the journey I have undertaken as an educator; what I have learned thus far has changed my approach to learning and teaching.  Since deciding to undertake this journey (which I blogged about in Can I be a Witness? and Starting a Journey of Reconciliation) I have immersed myself in history and witnessing all I can possibly witness within the time I have available.

Here, then, is a brief summary of my learning journey…

Reading

I re-read large sections of Shingwauk’s Vision: A History of Native Residential Schools by J.R. Miller and A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System 1879-1996 by John S. Milloy – books that I read years ago during my undergrad degree.  Simply put, I have found these two books to be quite an extensive history of the Residential School System in Canada, and they are excellent primary sources for any questions I have (or my students have) about the schools.

I also read a variety of novels and plays and began incorporating them into my teaching.  Some of my new favourites:

I’m also reading Empire of Wild by Cherie Dimaline… and it is likely to be on my favourties list in the near future.

Enrolling

I enrolled in a MOOC through the University of Alberta entitled Indigenous Canada.  I have completed 10 of the 12 modules (13 out of 15 course hours) and am really looking forward to finishing the course.   In my research and my curation of content for my Wakelet collections, I’ve found another MOOC through the University of Toronto that I intend to enroll in for next semester entitled Aboriginal Worldviews and Education.  I’m very thankful for the Open courses that are allowing me to learn so much from the comfort of my home without high tuition charges.

Collaborating

I joined a Truth and Reconciliation PLC (Professional Learning Community) in my school division, thanks to Curtis Bourassa and our FNMI consultant Raquel Oberkirsch.  We met for a full day of sharing and working together, with more meetings to come over the course of the year.  We are, collectively, working with resources and developing connections to curricula.  The high school (grades 10-12) teachers in the PLC have been tasked with examining the Treaty Outcomes and deciding which course(s) they best fit with to ensure they are thoroughly and respectfully embedded in appropriate content areas to provide meaningful treaty education.

 

Witnessing 

There were two major cultural events that had a large impact on me during the past few months – the Jeremy Dutcher concert on October 19 and the chamber opera, Missing, on November 8.  I blogged about the Jeremy Dutcher concert in Enrolling in MOOCs and Enjoying Live Music and discussed the opera in Where are they? MMIWG.

A new thing I learned is the making of Tobacco Ties or Prayer Ties.  Raquel (our FNMI consultant) demonstrated how to assemble the ties, discussed the colours of cloth and string, and we talked about the preferences a knowledge keeper or elder may have surrounding these.  The basics of making Tobacco Ties can be found HERE.  The most important piece to remember is that the making of Tobacco Ties or Prayer Ties should be done with reverence and respect, with good thoughts for the intended recipient.

Tobacco Ties
An example of Tobacco Ties

 

Another treasure I found is the movie The Grizzlies, based on a true story.  In a small Arctic town struggling with the highest suicide rate in North America, a group of Inuit students’ lives are transformed when they are introduced to the sport of lacrosse. (source)  With suicides among First Nations in the recent news, the movie is an excellent vehicle to get students to think about this critical issue.  The movie is powerful and moving.  Besides being an excellent film, the story about how the film was made is also inspiring.  Everyone involved in the project was committed to portraying the story in as authentic a manner as possible, from choosing the setting to casting the actors.  (To learn more about the making of the movie, see the article HERE).

 

Meeting

With my love of writing and stories, which I’ve discussed in numerous blog posts over the last few years, I was thrilled to meet and listen to Ernie Louttit.

“Indian Ernie” – a name he was given on the streets – is the author of three books.  In his talk with our students, he described how:

  • he joined the military and became a police officer despite being on his way to the bar!
  • language is power and he has a huge love for learning.
  • to be a good law enforcement officer, one must be a good story teller and have the ability to use words to recreate and tell the story about an incident.
  • being able to communicate effectively is important for ALL future goals and career aspirations.

As one of the key figures in seeing that justice was served in the Neil Stonechild case and who was instrumental in bringing down the “big guys” in the solvent huffing epidemic in Saskatoon, Ernie stated that he “doesn’t care who gets the credit, just so long as the job gets done.”  He challenged our students to “Be a Leader every day!  Encourage the people around you!”

 

Curating

Learning about Wakelet has been an absolute game changer for me both personally and professionally.  Saving tweets, teaching ideas, resources, articles to read, coaching ideas, Instagram posts… I have 25 collections right now with over 366 bookmarks.  I’ve downloaded the app on my mobile devices and added the extension to my Google browsers on each computer I use.

The collections I curated to document and enhance my learning project are all set to “Public” and can be copied for anyone wishing to use the resources I have collected.  I am adding to the collections as I discover new resources that I can use with students in my classes and would love to have contributors to my collections – please reach out to me if you would like to be a contributor to any of my collections and I would gladly add you!

Here are the links to each of the Wakelets that relate to my learning project:

It looks like a long list, but quite honestly, I feel like I have only scratched the surface and there is so much left to learn.  But, I have a lifetime in which to learn and I know I will continue to add to the collections as part of my ongoing journey.

 

Teaching

“When we know better, we do better” as the saying goes.  I don’t know if I’m a “master” teacher yet or if I will ever get there.  I still make a LOT of mistakes, lessons sometimes flop, I lose track of time, my pacing isn’t great sometimes … but I’m pretty good at learning!

The truths I have learned and the amazing stories I have witnessed over the past couple months while on the journey of my learning project will be shared with my classmates, my students, my colleagues, and anyone who wishes to use my Wakelets.  I hope that the collections can teach others and help them with their own learning journey.

As an educator committed to truth and reconciliation, I will use what I have learned to aid in building students’ capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect.

Thank you for this opportunity to learn.  

 

P.S. Visit me on Wakelet!

The Final Chapter: Summary of Learning

Can you believe it? We are almost at the end of a semester. EC&I 831 has come and gone (minus a few small tasks that need to get finished, along with a real life hangout!), but other than that, the final chapter is almost complete.

My very first Masters class is coming to an end, and I am feeling proud of what I have accomplished in the last three months. It’s hard to believe how much I experienced and learned through the duration of this course. I am incredibly grateful for my classmates and professor who motivated and inspired me along the way. To demonstrate what I have learned throughout the course, I created a Summary of my Learning.

I had so many ideas of where to go with this project, but in the end, I am glad I went with a tool that was easy to learn and for the most part, easy to use. I heard about the tool Video Scribe from the media creation list that Alec suggested. I tried to use the free trial version, but it had the company label as the background for the whole presentation, so instead, I paid a hefty $35 for a one month subscription. Fortunately, in the end, it was worth the money because it was convenient and fun to use!

Even though the program was easy to use, my project still took a lot of time to plan and develop. I spent a lot of time writing my summary, figuring out how to use the program, recording my voice on Garage Band, finding all of the images and clip art, timing the presentation, exporting it, and the list goes on. However, all of my hard work paid off because my Summary of Learning is ready to watch!

Enjoy!

The End of a Journey: Summary of Learning

The making of my Summary…

Maybe because I’m a bit nuts, I have always challenged myself to use a new tool for the Summary of Learning projects I’ve done for my grad classes with Alec.  This go-around was no exception.  I narrowed my choices down to two: Genial.ly and Sutori. Ultimately I chose Sutori because it had the least amount of options for creation!  Both can be used as presentation tools… but Genial.ly has WAY more capabilities than just a presentation tool and I did not want to fall into a rabbit hole.  Check it out for yourself!

Because I knew I wanted a way to include links to some of the content but still needed a way to share my learning in a “watchable” format for class, I “presented” my Summary of Learning on Sutori and captured it using Screencastify.  The link to the presentation on Sutori is here –SUMMARY OF LEARNING PRESENTATION.   When you view it as a presentation, you will notice the arrow beside some text.  Click on the arrow and it will open a hyperlinked site for you. 

The one link that I think everyone needs to explore is Top Tools for Learning 2019.  We have talked about or used a variety of these within our class this semester, but some of them are new to me and I am looking forward to exploring them.

As mentioned in my Summary and on Twitter, I curated a Wakelet of some of the Ed Tech we used this semester in class – check it out HERE.  I’d love to have more contributors – shoot me a message!  (and yes, I know I have a grammar error in my Tweet.  Ugh.)

As I mentioned, I used Screencastify to capture the entire presentation as well as to record a Star Wars Intro Crawler I created using part of our course syllabus.  Unfortunately this got cut from the presentation because my video became too long!  So, for your viewing pleasure, here you go!

 

 

A couple more tools:

I used Bitmoji for the cute little avatar likenesses – Bitmoji Kyla is way more put together than Real Life Kyla this last week, that’s for sure!

Bitmoji Image

 

and I used Canva to create two of the images in the presentation:

The Big Four – EC&I 831
Social Medium Exploration

 

Those are the highlights!  I hope you enjoy my summary of learning as much as I enjoyed my time in class this semester!

KYLA’S TOP TAKEAWAY from class:  Wakelet.  It has changed how I organize information in all aspects of my life.  Seriously.

 

Riding the #wakeletwave

 

I humbly present my Summary of Learning for EC&I 831.

Disclaimer:  I have a terrible cold and my nose is red and runny… hence, no webcam views of me.  You’re welcome.

 

Final Week – How to Play Jazz Piano

Here is a short video recapping my learning project journey:

To watch the video progress from week one, you can check out my YouTube playlist, or read the posts below.

To keep with the theme of my weekly posts, here are some reflections.

What I worked on:

  • I began my journey into the world of jazz piano by exploring:
    • jazz chord progressions (2-5-1)
    • the Blues
    • reading lead sheets
    • chord voicings and comping
    • two pieces – Misty and Autumn Leaves
    • early improvisation efforts

Wins:

  • Vlogging my entire experience and being vulnerable while learning a new skill
  • Making connections to my previous knowledge and adding to my music repertoire
  • Playing the piano without sheet music and experimenting. This is a new experience for me and I am really starting to enjoy the freedom.

Fails:

  • I had grand plans to become a gigging jazz musician by the end of this project, so I had to adjust my goals. I realized I need to practice a lot more.

What’s next?

  • I hope to continue improving my chord voicings, comping and reading lead sheet skills
  • Lots of jazzy Christmas music fun 🙂

EC&I 831 – Summary of Learning

My final summary of learning for EC&I 831: Social Media and Open Education:

In my summary of learning, I wanted to capture everything I have learned over the last few months. I thought it would be fun to incorporate the top 5 social media apps that we discussed in the course and challenge myself to use or understand the apps.

  • Snapchat (user for the last 3 years)
  • TikTok (user for 1 week)
  • Instagram (user for the last 8 years)
  • YouTube (user for 12 years – my first upload was July 2007!)
  • VSCO (user for 5 years, but only recently understanding the VSCO Girl concept)

I hope the brief social media interludes in the video highlight some of the obsessions and common uses of the apps. I will say one thing – if you have not downloaded TikTok, be careful. I fell into a deep, dark hole of videos for over 2 hours…you’ve been warned!

Secondly, I originally wanted to include Rick Mercer style rants addressing the main issues and topics in EC&I 831. I quickly realized that it is impossible to film in the “rant” style as a solo videographer with a selfie-stick and an iPhone. In the video, I discuss the topics that resonated with me the most:

Lastly, I tried to incorporate all my editing skills acquired over the last couple months with WeVideo, like video overlaying.

I hope you enjoy the video!

@Catherine_Ready

P.S. Thank you to my sister and brother-in-law for letting me use their business, Assiniboia Gallery to record the video. No baby or dog distractions!

Keeping the “Act” in Social Activism

Can a hashtag have impact? Can social media really cultivate change? In my experience, social media has enlightened me, inspired me, and has brought me awareness on various issues and topics, such as:

The power of social media has brought people together to fight for these issues (and more), created discussion and conversation surrounding the topics, and brought awareness to mass amounts of people. In other words, these movements were propelled through social activism.

Social activism can be broken down into two parts.

Social: It refers to using social media for activism. Social media becomes unique in the story of activism because, like Catherine says, it can “gain traction very quickly and draw in a large audience” due to its ability to share instantly.

Activism: According to Wikipedia, it is the “efforts to promote, impede, direct, or intervene in socialpoliticaleconomic, or environmental reform with the desire to make changes in society.” 

So in turn, social activism plays a large role in our society today when it comes to social justice issues.

However, is it enough? The current topic of debate in our #eci831 class is: Can social activism be meaningful and worthwhile?

Daniel brings up an important point by saying “activism requires concrete actions and changes in behavior.” He goes on to say that using social media, such as changing a profile picture or retweeting a social justice issue, is the easy part. It’s much harder to spend time face to face, or doing something concrete, in order to bring change to a critical issue. In a Macleans article by Scott Gilmore, the term #slacktivism is highlighted. If you are new to the word, it’s “showing support for a cause with the main purpose of boosting the egos of participants in the movement.” In the article about #slacktivism, he writes:

“A slacktivist is someone who… will wear a T-shirt to raise awareness. She will wear a wristband to demonstrate support, sign a petition to add her voice, share a video to spread the message, even pour a bucket of ice over her head. The one thing slacktivists don’t do is help by, for example, giving money or time to those who are truly making the world a better place: the cancer researcher, the aid worker, the hospice manager.”

These are all valid points, especially since social activism can lack two big components: time and money. In saying that though, it’s important to remember the benefits that social activism can bring to our communities, our classrooms, and our world. Social media brings relevance to social justice issues through conversation and online discussions because “in today’s digital age it provides a voice for others“, a valuable point brought up by Curtis. Not only does it provide a voice for many, it also gives the opportunity to stand up for the marginalized on a larger level because it has the capacity to reach millions.

Yes, it can be dangerous to encourage social activism without action, but can it be meaningful and worthwhile? Of course. There are a lot of things to be critical about when it comes to social activism, but in the end, it’s important because it creates awareness, draws support, and brings forth a greater community for the cause.

Digital Citizenship in Social Activism

Digital citizenship plays an important role in social activism, especially in the classroom. However, the way that many educators have seen digital citizenship is much different than how it should be used in our classrooms today. Some may say that “digital citizenship can be defined as engaging in appropriate and responsible behaviour when using technology.”

Appropriate and responsible behaviour. Is that all digital citizenship is? Is that what it should be?

In my opinion, it goes far beyond the “do’s” and “don’ts” of the internet. In the words of Katia Hildebrandt, “Being a good digital citizen is about so much more than being safe and responsible online. It’s about participating in meaningful ways to promote equity in networked spaces.

If we want to raise a generation of young people who are inspired and motivated to create change, then we need to instil “digital leadership” in our students. In my latest podcast, I discussed the idea that George Couros brings up about moving from Digital Citizenship to Digital Leadership– “using the vast reach of technology (especially the use of social media) to improve the lives, well-being, and circumstances of others.”

Using the internet in a responsible and ethical way is good, but using the internet to inspire and improve the lives of others is better.

Jennifer Casa-Todd brings up five important ways to use digital leadership in the elementary classroom:

  1. Empower others who have no voice
  2. Address societal inequality
  3. Promote important causes
  4. Learn and share their learning
  5. Be a more positive influence in the lives of others

Citizenship vs Digital Citizenship

Instead of separating citizenship and digital citizenship so distinctly with our students, we need to remember that technology and social media are integrated into their day-to-day lives. We should encourage them to be leaders in every aspect of their lives, including social media. Christy Fennewald brings up an interesting point when she says “citizenship doesn’t end when you shut down the laptop or silence the smartphone. It’s all around us. And it’s just citizenship, period.” As educators, we have the opportunity to cultivate student leaders and citizens who aren’t afraid of making positive change through social media.

Joel Westheimer talks about the 3 types of citizens:

  1. Personally Responsible
  2. Participatory
  3. Justice Oriented

In a recent presentation, Dr. Alec Couros draws attention to some examples that fall under the three categories of citizens, specifically online.

IMG_0887
Image from Dr. Alec Couros
(from Catherine Ready‘s blog)
  1. The personally responsible citizen might sign online petitions, share inoffensive articles, or donate online to their favourite causes.
  2. The participatory citizen might develop and/or share petitions, initiate online fundraisers, or actively share or create information for the social good.
  3. The justice oriented citizen might share articles that disrupt normative thinking, engage in controversial and uncomfortable discussion, or campaign to work toward social change and equity.

The important difference between the three types of citizens is that the justice oriented citizen looks at understanding the underlying issue and acts to solve root causes.

How do we raise these types of citizens? As a primary teacher, implementing social justice in my classroom seems overwhelming at times. However, it helps when I start with empathy. Fostering a community of empathy and understanding is where I always begin. Once students have empathy towards others, they can start to create change.

It’s important for students to know that they are not too young to make a difference and their voices matter in the movement of social activism. As educators, it’s our responsibility to empower our students so that they can use their online presence to do something positive for our world.

So, is it possible for a hashtag to have impact? Yes, but it doesn’t just stop there. Let’s model and teach our students to move from participating citizens, to engaged and justice oriented citizens. We don’t want to forget the act in #socialactivism.

Week 8 – How to Play Jazz Piano (Improv Attempts)

One of my biggest challenges in learning how to play jazz music has been figuring out how to practice.  With classical music, my practice has always been very “prescribed” – technical warm ups and practice, followed by working on specific pieces. This might include hands separate practice, slow metronome work and focusing on small sections.  In fact, it was very rare that I would do a full run through of a piece because it was not an efficient use of my practice time.  With my jazz learning project, I feel like I am always jumping to the “full run through” phase without taking the time to build a solid foundation.  Looks like I need to take my own advice! This week I tried slowing down and focusing on some of the fundamental aspects of crafting a solo.  My recap this week highlights that I have a long way to go!

What I worked on:

  • Started practicing how to solo (improvise) over “Autumn Leaves”.
  • Scales, scales and more scales!
soloing over autumn leaves A section
Example of different scale patterns

Wins:

  • I found a few great resources that help me understand why you choose particular scales to create your solos. It was a nice connection to my previous scale practice from studying classical music.

Fails:

  • I underestimated the amount of practice needed to incorporate these news scales in my soloing – I need more time.
  • I felt very “stiff” – afraid of playing the “wrong note”. I need to loosen up!

Resources used:

Next week will be my final learning project post. I plan to reflect on my progress over the last two months and make a plan for future practice.  This is only the beginning of my jazz journey!

The Potential of Social Media Activism

The word activism makes me think about protests, signs, marches and fighting for change – trying to make the world a better place.  But this is only one part of the picture.

45122658861_80f8f21964
Photo Credit: Fibonacci Blue Flickr via Compfight cc

Simply defined, activism is  “taking action to effect social change” and involves efforts that “promote, impede, direct, or intervene in social, political, economic, or environmental reform“.  In other words, activism can have both positive and negative effects on the social agenda of specific groups.

For the purpose of our class, we discussed activism through social media and were asked to consider the following questions:

Can online social activism be meaningful and worthwhile? Is is possible to have productive conversations about social justice online? What is our responsibility as educators to model active citizenship online?

What is social media activism?

Social media activism is essentially using the platform of an online forum to lead or support a cause. It’s activism behind a screen.” (The Journal – Queen’s University)

“Bringing change or awareness about a cause through the use of social media, by posting or sharing ones thought about a particular event or issue.” (Life of Anna)

These definitions are very basic, but “social media activism” is somewhat self-explanatory – it is activism using social media. It could be liking or sharing a post on Facebook or using a hashtag in online posts to bring awareness to a particular issue.  If you use social media, you have probably viewed or participated in hashtag activism:

You may have added a filter to your Facebook profile picture to temporarily support a cause. Or clicked the retweet button to raise awareness while drinking your morning coffee. The question we must ask ourselves is if social media activism is meaningful and worthwhile and looking at the positive and negatives is one way to explore the answer.

Pros of Social Media Activism

“Successful maneuvering of social media platforms creates significant changes in society through the impact of an individual who cultivates awareness and makes knowledge accessible to millions.” Human Rights Education Research Outreach

Social media activism can:

  • Spread a message to a large audience very quickly
  • Organize events easily (like the Women’s March)
  • Allow marginalized groups to express their views freely

Using the power of networks, “online activism allows activists to organize events with high levels of engagement, focus and network strength” (The Conversation).  The ability to share, like and retweet instantly allows movements and causes to gain traction very quickly and draw in a large audience.  For example, when a tragic events occur, vigils are planned, shared and attended in a short time frame, all thanks to social media.  Larger events are organized in locations all over the world through hashtags and social media posts.

Greta Thunberg stops by City Hall, tells Mayor Valérie Plante she’s “still very overwhelmed” by the march today in Montreal. Calls crowd of 500,000 “unbelievable.” #climatestrikemontreal pic.twitter.com/Mz8vYrjXjU

— T’Cha Dunlevy (@TChaDunlevy) September 27, 2019

Finally, the good, badly and ugly part of the Internet is that you can post and support whatever you want at any time.  A positive example is that people all over the world can be part of Pride festivals, even if they are unable to attend in person.

One of the greatest things about social media is the platform it can give to otherwise isolated and marginalized people. Entire communities have developed and grown together over social media, and this has exponentially strengthened many activism campaigns. Social media platforms like Instagram and Twitter allow people to organize events and communicate on a medium that is accessible to anybody who has an email address, internet, and some kind of connectable device. This vastly increases potential audience size, and ultimately increases the possible effect that these campaigns can have on policies, politics, and everyday life.The Power of Social Media in Modern Activism

Cons of Social Media Activism

“The ease with which current social movements form often fails to signal an organizing capacity powerful enough to threaten those in authority.” Zeynep Tufekci

Unfortunately, social media activism has drawbacks:

  • #Slacktivism
  • Spreading misinformation
  • Unable to promote “real” change

A 2014 Maclean’s article explains that a “slacktivist is someone who believes it is more important to be seen to help than to actually help. He will wear a T-shirt to raise awareness. She will wear a wristband to demonstrate support, sign a petition to add her voice, share a video to spread the message, even pour a bucket of ice over her head.”  All of this takes place instead of offering time or money which could truly help a cause.

Image result for actions speak louder than like buttonsMy classmate Brooke dives into a deep discussion of #slacktivism and a few articles that explain and criticize the movement.  She included this image (shared in class by Dr. Couros) that highlights the problem with #slacktivism.

“If our desire for social change extends beyond the resolution of a single issue, we need to close our laptops, turn off our phones, and spend time in the presence of others.” – The Walrus

With the ease of liking and sharing posts or adding a hashtag, it is inevitable that the wrong information will be passed along.  #FakeNews is a perfect example of deliberately sharing misinformation, which was particularly problematic during the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election#Kony2012 is another example of a movement that exploded on social media without really understanding the true facts.  Social media activism has the potential to raise awareness, spread a message quickly and help grow a movement.  But it is important to not disregard the power of slow-growing, face-to-face, grassroots organization. Wael Ghonim (an Internet activist that helped organize the social media campaign during the #ArabSpring) discusses challenges facing social media today and how it can be used to promote real change:

Before we can have conversations about social justice online, I think it is important to discuss the concept of a digital citizen and to understand three different ideas of citizenship as discussed by Westheimer and Kahne in the article, “What Kind of Citizen“.

IMG_0887
Screen-captured image from class with Dr. Couros
  • Participatory – actively participates
  • Personally Responsible – acts responsibly in their community
  • Justice-Oriented – seeks to understand root cause

Katia Hildebrandt writes about the Digital Citizenship Guide in Saskatchewan Schools , which explains that,

“digital citizenship asks us to consider how we act as members of a network of people that includes both our next-door neighbours and individuals on the other side of the planet and requires an awareness of the ways in which technology mediates our participation in this network.” 

With this knowledge, we are able to explore the possibilities of using social media to talk about social justice issues online.  Below, I have shared Brooke’s (she made some excellent points in her post this week!) example of how each type of citizen may participate, using the food bank as an example:

The personally responsible citizen might donate money to the food bank online or share an article about how the food bank is in need of donations.

The participatory citizen might create an online fundraiser, like a GoFundMe page, where people can donate to the food bank and use their social media page to highlight some of the issues related to perceived injustices regarding food security. They may also decide to volunteer at the food bank.

The justice-oriented citizen might use their social media page to share potentially controversial articles, and viewpoints which spark discussion about the root causes of food security, inviting others to join the discussion and organizing followers to contribute to participating in working towards social change in online and offline spaces.

The conversations about social justice can happen online, but they are more effective when they are rooted in offline organizational efforts.  Another point is that online discussions should take place with the intent to promote change or raise awareness, rather than use the post for personal gratification (for example, getting lots of likes or shares).  But how do we teach our students to use social media to have meaningful conversations about social justice issues online?

Educator Responsibility

As educators teaching students who only know a world with social media, we should:

In Spring 2018, I participated in a joint Regina Public Schools/Regina Catholic Schools project called #YQRActivistArt.  The project involved bringing the Landfill Harmonic Orchestra to Regina with an opportunity for our students to see the group perform live. To participate in the project, you had to commit to producing an art project in response to a social issue.  Through planning and collaboration with other classes, our students chose social issues they wanted to explore and created an art piece to raise awareness about the issue.  Every school did something different, and my students presented their projects in a school wide gallery opening:

The reason I share this story is because of the importance of teaching activism in schools. My students were engaged, motivated and excited to spread awareness and it allowed us to have conversations about meaningful and worthwhile ways to share information about different social issues.  The guide, “Facilitating Activist Education” explains by teaching about activism, students may become “engaged citizen-activists – people who see themselves as capable of affecting positive change for social and ecological justice”.

By starting with offline activism experiences for our students, we can then move online with confidence.

“Edtech, at its very core, is about privilege” – Katia Hildebrandt

Hildebrandt explains that by participating in social media activism, we take a few things for granted, like access to educational tools, computers and the Internet.  With this privilege, she adds that “we have a responsibility to risk our privilege to give voice to social inequities and injustices. We have a responsibility to risk our privilege to give voice to those who have no privilege to risk.”  Furthermore, as educators we have the responsibility to teach our students about this privilege. Wasting our time with #slacktivism is not an option because we have the power and ability to promote real change with our access to edtech tools and social media to support these efforts.

Jeffrey Knutson explains that, “we need to teach digital and media literacy in the context of empathy and understanding each other’s differences. Talk about integrity, the importance of humility, and other important SEL (social and emotional learning) skills while working on digital citizenship and media literacy.” He also provides two Common Sense Education tools to lead the teaching and learning: SEL Toolkit for Educators and the Digital Citizenship and SEL Guide.

Finally, Yes Magazine shares four tips for using social media activism:

  1. Take advantage of interactive activism opportunities in online communities
  2. Make sure your activism is accessible and inclusive
  3. Remember that small steps are critical to getting the work
  4. Share the work that other activists are doing

To engage our students, we need to provide relevant tools and information to “speak their language” (using social media and edtech). Through conversations of digital citizenship and offline activism, we have the ability (and responsibility) to mold the next generation as informed and compassionate citizens who care about social justice issues.  Let’s use social media to make the conversation relevant for our youth.

“Social media activism is great for so many reasons: It is more widely accessible, it gets conversations started, it sustains momentum, and it helps empower people who may have never thought of themselves as activists.”Yes Magazine

Until next time,

@Catherine_Ready

Week 7: How to Play Jazz Piano (Autumn Leaves, Part I)

As we near the end of our learning projects, I started working on my final goal piece, the jazz standard “Autumn Leaves“. This has always been one of my favourites and my earliest introduction to jazz music.  After a little bit of analysis, I found that it follows the simple 2-5-1 chord progression I started working on at the beginning of my learning project.

I love that I can start transferring my new skills to different pieces! Here is my progress this week:

What I worked on:

Wins:

Fails:

  • This week was heavy on sheet music use, but I tried to use it as a tool (by analyzing the score) rather than a crutch.

Resources used:

Next week I will continue with Autumn Leaves, but I plan to go back to only using a lead sheet and begin practicing scales for improvising.

Week 6: How to Play Jazz Piano (without chord roots!)

This week was all about rootless voicings on the piano.  I carried on with my work on ‘Misty’ from last week and tried a different style of comping.  I originally planned on introducing another song this week, but I found the rootless voicings to be challenging and require more time.  I tried figuring out the voicings in my head at the piano, but it was too much to think about. So I decided to break it down by going back to the theory basics and writing out each chord, determining the root, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th and 13th.  Then, I wrote out the chords transitions so that there would be nice voice leading and common tones between the chords.

A side note about voice leading: I studied a lot of Bach chorales in my first and second year of music school, with the goal of understanding proper voice leading. There are lots of “rules” with voice leading, but they help with problems like:

“smoothness, independence and integrity or melodic lines, tonal fusion (the preference for simultaneous notes to form a consonant unity), variety, motion (towards a goal)” – Open Music Theory

Open Music Theory is an open source textbook (open educational resource). Cool!

In short, good voice leading makes music sound pleasing to the human ear! I really like the end result of my progress this week:

What I worked on:

  • continued with “Misty” – added a separate recording of the bass line in the left hand so I could comp using rootless voicings
  • rootless chord voicings – figuring out which notes to play and using good voice leading

Wins:

  • Starting to incorporate good voice leading
  • Overlaying multiple videos in my vlog

Fails:

  • I had to write out the chords this week (instead of figuring out the chords in my head). Although not my original plan, it allowed me to really understand the theoretical sides of rootless chords and good voice leading.

Resources Used:

Next week I am going to begin my final piece as part of my learning project. I am looking forward to learning my favourite jazz standard, “Autumn Leaves”.