Three Kids One Stomach Bug and Some Reflections on Kony 2012

What a week.  Three of my four children were sick with some kind of enteric stomach bug that would bring  a woolly mammoth to it’s knees.  The afternoon and evening had been cacophony of tears, dry heaves and vomit. My wife and I fought valiantly against the scourge than has consumed our children. The only weapons at our disposal were children’s Gravol, ginger ale and towels.

For awhile the outcome looked bleak. Eventually we managed to stem the torrent of barf by putting the the quarantined children into a Gravol induced coma.   As I cleaned the hallway with the last Lysol wipe, I could hear the kids grunting and moaning in their beds. This is what  a civil war hospital must have sounded like. I thought to myself (upon refection civil war hospitals were probably better organized with less vomit and requests for Paw Patrol).  I finished cleaning the floor and basked in our victory. Then it dawned on me. It was Tuesday. Class started in ten minutes. Thank goodness for online learning.

The discussion on online activism was thought provoking for me. As I sat there in the glow of the laptop screen with my one year old son on my knee, I realized how long it had been since I thought about Joseph Kony . I remember the first time I saw the Kony 2012 campaign flash across my Facebook feed. To be honest, I was impressed at the thought of being involved in a grass roots movement, using social media to contribute to bringing awareness and change to a major international issue. My Facebook feed was adorned with comments like ” It is good to see people getting behind something like this.” I watched the likes and shares pile up. How could you not behind a movement such as this? In retrospect this movement was not free from some well founded criticisms.

As the saying goes hindsight is always twenty twenty. This video from 2013 sums up a number of issues of the Kony 2012 movement.  However, at the time it felt like an unbridled wave of positive energy and influence. As a young man, I got caught in the altruistic hype that surrounded the campaign.

Then as quickly as it came the Kony 2012 movement faded. The rampant idealism of the campaign was replaced by the (as the above video so eloquently puts it)  next internet craze featuring a man dancing like a horse . This rapid exit from public consciousness caused some to view the Kony 2012 campaign as a punchline and a shining example of quick and easy activism .

I did not realize how cynical I was of internet activism until last week’s class. I would be bothered by statues strung together with hashtags drawing attention to various causes and profile pictures sporting different filters. Why is this? Am I getting crusty as I approach middle age? Am I an old man yelling at the kids to get off my digital  lawn?

Source: Giphy

I don’t think so. I think that Kony 2012 taught me to think more critically about online social action. I need to be careful that I don’t ignore the benefits of digital activism. In the final analysis, Kony 2012 did in fact demonstrate how social media can be used to bring awareness to a cause . It also showed the importance of skepticism when considering digital social movements . In the end, Kony 2012 serves as an example of the power of social media and digital activism and the need to use social media responsibly as platform for social action.

I was not expecting to have such a marked reaction to the subject of digital activism. I would be interested to hear other viewpoints and opinions. How does digital change as social media advances? How is involvement in a cause defined? With so many options for communication, how does one ensure a consistent message ? I know I have just touched the surface of a complex and intriguing subject. These are just a few of the questions rolling around in my brain at 12:30 on a Friday night. Thank for taking the time to read this and please share your thoughts in the comments if you are so inclined. See you in class!

 


Digital Identity and Schools

We were asked this week to talk about one of a few different things and of the list, I chose Digital Identity. I chose digital identity because I feel like it relates to my learning project as it will be a topic that I discuss with my students while we are blogging and considering when we are presenting ourselves online.

Maintaining your digital identity is a complex task. This has a lot to do with the ability to take things from the internet and claim them as your own along with the fact that once it is online, there is no way to take it back and it will always be documented on the internet.

6310449752_1dbd451c64_d
Photo Credit: Oliver Dunkley Flickr via Compfight cc

When I look at my digital identity, some of the things that I do to manage it is to do regular checks of my security settings on my various social media accounts as well as mediate and go on what I call an “unfriending spree”. I go through those who have the most open access to my accounts every 2-3 months and consider if they still need to be my friend or connection on my social media account and often unfriend quite a few people every time I do this. I have also become more selective on who I will be connected to.

Not only do I limit and restrict who has access to me on certain accounts, I also censor what I share, like, and comment on. I recognize that every time I engage with certain content online, others online are able to see what I have engaged with. When I go to share a video, like a photo, or comment on someone’s status, I always take a moment to consider how this will affect me as a teacher if someone sees it, can it be “used against me” in some way? That teacher hat never comes off and therefore I need to ensure that I am always acting “on duty”. I also have to consider my division’s procedure for Use of Social Media.

When talking with students, or when I see students interacting on various forms of social media, I try to share the risks of sharing online. My division has a policy on what students are allowed to share and I have dealt with some issues of inappropriate use of social media as an acting administrator in my building but I feel that more needs to be done in order to help students understand the effects of them sharing personal information online. This is part of the reason why I have chosen my major project to involve interacting online through blogs. The blogs will allow me to bring digital citizenship and some of the laws and regulations of sharing images, photos, and the work of others into the classroom in a real and applicable manner where they may demonstrate more “buy-in” to the ideas of being a citizen of the digital world and not just someone who uses it.

Do you have personal rules or procedures you use to ensure the security and appropriateness of your social media accounts? Do you add your students (current or past)? Does your division have a policy around social media that you are required or recommended to follow?


What the heck are macros????

So apparently calculating “macros” is a MUST now in the eating and fitness world.  So what the heck are “macros”?  Well I have done a lot of reading and have come up with this simple explanation….

Macronutrients, or “macros,” are the building blocks of nutrition. The typical person knows and refers to them as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Macros are the nutrients you need in large amounts, because they provide the body with the calories it needs to function. Understanding macros can help lay a solid foundation for a balanced keto diet.

Carbohydrate + Protein + Fat = Total Calories

It is recommended by the health professionals that we have been following for many years to eat the following daily percentages of macros:

Carbohydrate: 45 to 65 percent

Protein: 10 to 35 percent

Fat: 20 to 35 percent

A person eating KETO eats the following daily percentages for macros:

Carbohydrates: 3 – 5 percent

Protein: 24 – 27 percent

Fat: 72 – 78 percent

WOWZA…. what a difference.  Well this is what the KETO WOE is all about.  Extremely reduced carbohydrates, moderate protein and high fat intake so the body is forced to burn fat as an energy source because it is depleted in carbohydrates.

ff9d18b0356b290014385648659d2581_a-macro-meme-macro-counting-meme_500-500.jpeg
Source: antranik.org

So off I went to calculate the necessary macros I need for the KETO WOE and weight loss.  Up to this time, I was guessing…. but now things are about to get serious.  There are many different sites that you can google to calculate your macros, but I found this one to be the easiest.

After plugging in all my numbers, height, weight, gender, body fat percentage and activity level, I received my macro circle. I was given 3 choices, depending on what my goals were.  I chose the second option, simply because I want to loose weight, in a healthy manner and be able to maintain what I am doing in the future.

Screenshot_20171020-191530.png
source: Ketodiet-Buddy.com

So the goal to be on the KETO WOE is to eat…..

CARBOHYDRATES – 4% or 20 grams

PROTEINS: 24% or 113 grams

FATS:  72% or 151 grams.

I can do this… I will do this.

Stay tuned for next week to see how a week of tracking my macros, and trying out some new recipes goes.


What the heck are macros????

So apparently calculating “macros” is a MUST now in the eating and fitness world.  So what the heck are “macros”?  Well I have done a lot of reading and have come up with this simple explanation….

Macronutrients, or “macros,” are the building blocks of nutrition. The typical person knows and refers to them as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Macros are the nutrients you need in large amounts, because they provide the body with the calories it needs to function. Understanding macros can help lay a solid foundation for a balanced keto diet.

Carbohydrate + Protein + Fat = Total Calories

It is recommended by the health professionals that we have been following for many years to eat the following daily percentages of macros:

Carbohydrate: 45 to 65 percent

Protein: 10 to 35 percent

Fat: 20 to 35 percent

A person eating KETO eats the following daily percentages for macros:

Carbohydrates: 3 – 5 percent

Protein: 24 – 27 percent

Fat: 72 – 78 percent

WOWZA…. what a difference.  Well this is what the KETO WOE is all about.  Extremely reduced carbohydrates, moderate protein and high fat intake so the body is forced to burn fat as an energy source because it is depleted in carbohydrates.

ff9d18b0356b290014385648659d2581_a-macro-meme-macro-counting-meme_500-500.jpeg
Source: antranik.org

So off I went to calculate the necessary macros I need for the KETO WOE and weight loss.  Up to this time, I was guessing…. but now things are about to get serious.  There are many different sites that you can google to calculate your macros, but I found this one to be the easiest.

After plugging in all my numbers, height, weight, gender, body fat percentage and activity level, I received my macro circle. I was given 3 choices, depending on what my goals were.  I chose the second option, simply because I want to loose weight, in a healthy manner and be able to maintain what I am doing in the future.

Screenshot_20171020-191530.png
source: Ketodiet-Buddy.com

So the goal to be on the KETO WOE is to eat…..

CARBOHYDRATES – 4% or 20 grams

PROTEINS: 24% or 113 grams

FATS:  72% or 151 grams.

I can do this… I will do this.

Stay tuned for next week to see how a week of tracking my macros, and trying out some new recipes goes.


Social Justice in the Online World

Social activism or social slacktivism?

The burning question this week (drum roll please)…

Can online social activism be meaning and worthwhile? 

I think the short answer is yes! Of course. There are meaningful examples of social activism online however I do feel this can quickly become overshadowed by social slacktivism which is becoming more and more visible on my own social feeds now that I’m more aware of armchair activism and tuning in.

Unnamed image

Image via Google Definition

Take the #bringbackourgirls movement for example. Maclean’s article “The Problem with Slacktivism” argues the #BringBackOurGirls campaign is the” latest disgrace from slacktivists, those who support good causes by doing very little, and achieving even less.

A slacktivist is someone who believes it is more important to be seen to heImage result for bring back our girlslp than to actually help.”  It’s become very common to simply comment or share a post of a genuine cause and believe we are helping when in reality it is achieving nothing but a trending hashtag. Is tweeting out a particular hashtag really going to help the cause? The Maclean’s article makes the point that if people really wanted to help, they would simply donate instead of pinning a pink ribbon to their jacket, or not shaving their face in the month of November, claiming “These things are not the talismans of empathetic supporters. They are proof that you care more about yourself than
Image via mirror                                    the cause.”
This leads me to question how many people draw attention to themselves during the Movember campaign or the Ice Bucket Challenge actually fail to donate to the cause, while gaining the positive attention they are looking for.

Image result for social activism online
Image via @ROSAPRINCEUK

To counteract this, I do believe in many of these causes that go viral and explode on social media draw an impressive amount of attention and awareness, and as a result of the buzz generate more donations than they perhaps would have without the use of social media and doesn’t that account for something?

And then there is opposite side of the spectrum – people who demonstrate fear of judgement for sharing their opinion on hot topic issues and social justice causes. This is something many teachers can relate to in the fear of judgement from parents and most often their employer. Katia Hildebrant makes a compelling argument on her blog post that  “In Online Spaces, Silent Speaks as Loudly as Words”

What message do we send when we say nothing at all?  Katia explains “If we are online, as educators, and we remain silent about issues of social justice, if we tweet only about educational resources and not about the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report in Canada, or about the burning of Black churches in the southern United States, we are sending a clear message: These issues are not important.”

Katia’s argument made rethink my own use of social media and social justice issues. Although I visit my social media feeds often to check the news and occasionally share special events to stay connected to friends and family, I seldom use it as a tool for social activism.  Could I be doing more? Clearly the answers is yes.  Although I will sometimes share a post outlining a cause I believe in, I very rarely involve myself in political posts and discussions. But why? Was I worried about whether people would disagree or judge? I’m not sure – I think partially yes. There is an aspect of fear of judgement. I haven’t made the choice to use social media in this way.Image result for don't speak monkey I could relate to blogger Debs post Why I’m Scared to Express my Opinion Online who commented on the “barrage” of tweet replies a friend received after voicing her opinion online. Although I’ve never experienced this barrage, I often choose not to comment to avoid it. She speaks about avoiding the Twitter drama, which is something I feel holds me back from posting my opinion. I don’t want to get caught up in an online battle and it seems as though people love getting into these heated online debates that really aren’t my personality or style. Do I need to become braver? Do these online battles of opinion make a difference?

Katia’s post made me consider my privilege, along with the responsibilities I have as an educator to model active digital citizenship online. In our second reading from Katia’s blog posts titled “What Kind of Digital Citizen?” was an informative read for me, particularly reading into  Joel Westheimer’s framework about “Kinds of Citizens”. as I immediately thought of my learning project which combines social media use in the classroom using a classroom Twitter account and implementing a digital citizenship curriculum.  I do believe we have a responsibility to teach students how to be responsible citizens and move them along the continuum of being a “Personally Responsible Citizen” who volunteers to someone who advocates organizes, and seeks answers to areas of injustice.


Image via Westheimer’Article as cited by Katia Hildebrandt

Right now, my project is focused on issues such as “The Power of Words” online and more basic, yet still important, aspects of technology use. I think it’s important to remember that students don’t have to stay in this “box” of general citizenship and to think outside the box in terms of also teaching more justice driven citizens.  I think I model digital citizenship but in terms of social activism in an online space, I’m not sure I’m there yet and to be honest I’m not exactly sure how to model this well.

Parting Thoughts & questions
I believe all teachers should share responsibility as educators to provide experiences for students to explore issues of injustice and ways we can help both online and offline. This should happen across all grades so once these students have a foundation of citizenship they can continue to build on this and push outside the box of a personally responsible citizen towards becoming “Justice Oriented”  leaders in the community. This is an exciting prospect and I would like to see some examples of how classrooms and teachers are doing this.

Do you keep your opinions to yourself or are you an open book online?

How do you model social activism in the digital world? 


It Begins with a Blink

I have decided that I want to structure the posts about my EC&I 831 learning project in a way that would allow for my robotics students in the future to follow along. Kind of as a how to guide on programming an arduino board. This means that I am going to likely have some really short posts and some longer ones depending on what it is that I am trying to learn, and also what I am wanting the students to learn. This also means that sometimes I may post multiple shorter posts if they are about simpler concepts. The other thing is that I am going to use titles to create sections to make the learning easier. Let me know in the comments if you think that this format is helpful to facilitating learning.

Desired Outcome:

  • To do a barebones program that familiarizes me with the bare basics of an arduino sketch.

Supplies Needed:

  • This one is extremely basic. You just require the arduino uno board, a USB to connect it to your computer and a computer.

Hardware setup:

  • Nothing too much to setup for this one. You just need to plug the arduino uno board into your computer using the usb cable.

Software setup:

  • The very first thing is to download the software. The software that you write any program in is called the IDE, integrated development environment. Arduino’s IDE writes programs in a computer language called c++. You have two options you can either download the IDE to work on your computer, or if you want they have an online IDE that you can use.
  • To start with open a new sketch. This is what the programs are called when working with an arduino.
  • Sketches are detailed instructions that the arduino will follow. We will look more at the c++ language variant that Arduino uses later, and I will return to his post at that time to link to it. For now if you would like to know more about the language you can check out the Arduino language reference.
  • If you have an Arduino IDE running you can copy everything from the next bullet point into it. The nice thing is it becomes easier to read once in the IDE because it gets colour coded.
  • /* This is a multiline comment. In this sketch we are going to make an LED
    * on the Arduino board blink. It is the built in LED attached to PIN 13.
    * This means that there is no hardware required to setup.
    */

    int ledPin = 13;
    /*This is an integer variable. It creates a variable called ledPin. It also
    * tells the Arduino that ledPin is attached to pin #13
    */

    void setup()
    {
    pinMode (ledPin, OUTPUT);
    }
    /* This setup part tells the arduino to make the variable ledPin into an output.
    * This means that it can be sent information. As opposed to an input.
    */

    void loop()
    {
    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
    delay(200);
    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
    delay(200);
    }
    /* The loop funtion will repeat everything over and over again.
    * In this case it will turn the light on for 200 milliseconds,
    * and then turn the light off for 200 milliseconds. It will blink.
    */

Things I learned:

I learned that arduino is not a computer language. I had assumed it was it’s own computer language but it is written in a language called c++.

I also learned about how  functions work within c++. A function is like an isolated set of instructions. If you have every programmed in BASIC it is a subroutine. This actually will work well for my students when I explain it to them since they learn to program in BASIC. Also functions are self contained units so this will make fixing mistakes, debugging, programs easier as individual functions can be turned on or off easily to see if they are the ones causing the problem.

I did have trouble uploading the program at first and so I also discovered that there is a very useful troubleshooting forum. It turned out that I had the arduino port set to the wrong usb. Once I switched that it uploaded fine. I was briefly worded that maybe the arduino had been broken when I lent it out to a student last year.

I learned a number of functions in this simple program.

  1. void Setup = This is a function that sets up all of the inputs and outputs that you will use in the program. It runs a single time and then moves to the next function.
  2. void Loop = This is a function that runs multiple times. It will keep repeating whatever is in it.
  3. pinMode (pin,input/output) = This is a function that takes two pieces of information (called arguments) a pin and whether you want it to be an input or an output.
  4. digitalWrite (pin, HIGH/LOW) = This is a function that takes two arguments, a pin and whether you want it on, HIGH, or off, LOW.
  5. delay(value) = This is a function that takes a single argument, the amount of milliseconds you want the previous function to run for.

So already from writing a super simple program I have learned how to declare functions, how to set pins as inputs or outputs and how to turn pins on or off. Also I want to acknowledge that I got the idea for this initial sketch from another blog Forefront.io.

Video of it working:

Also I took this bried video of it working. Hope you enjoy.

Thanks for stoping by. Have a great night.


The Golden Rule

This week, we discussed social activism online and whether or not it can be effective.  Is it worthwhile?  I think it is possible for it to be worthwhile and meaningful if the people that are advocating for the cause are invested beyond just social media.  We discussed in class the idea of slackivism.  Wikipedia explains this to be the concept that people believe that are contributing to a cause by simply re-tweeting, sharing or liking a page.  However, sharing or liking something on Facebook, although a great way to create more acknowledgement towards a specific issue, does not solve the issue.  It is a way to share information and give people who actually WANT to create change, a medium to do so.

Khaled_Mohamed_Saeed
Image Via Wikipedia

One excellent example I found was Wael Ghonim: a social activist who used social media to help create the revolution in Egypt in 2011.  Essentially the movement began with the death of Khaled Said, and a picture that was posted and shared relentlessly on social media.  This sparked interest and Ghonim created a Facebook page to support this outrage.  He gathered hundreds of thousands of followers; then realized, it wasn’t enough to just gather online.  They needed to do something.  He asked his users an important question: “Today is the 14th of January. The 25th of January is Police Day. It’s a national holiday. If 100,000 of us take to the streets of Cairo, no one is going to stop us. I wonder if we could do it.” (TED, 2015)  And they did it.  The video goes on to explain the aftermath and the revolution we know today.  I think it is awe-inspiring that something so life-changing began on social media and with one picture.

As educators, I think we do have a responsibility to model active citizenship online, but it can be difficult.  As teachers, we are on the radar all the time.  Anything we say online can be traced, twisted, or interpreted the wrong way and it can affect us, personally and professionally.  The challenge then becomes to advocate professionally and ask ourselves questions before interacting online:

  • “How will this be viewed by people who do not know me?”
  • “How will this be viewed by people that do know me?”
  • “Would I be okay if my students saw this?”
  • “Would I be okay if my colleagues/family saw this?”

Although, it is unfortunate we cannot be as uncensored as other people can be online, are these not questions we consider before speaking out loud?  Why should what we discuss online be different than what we talk about in our classrooms or in our day-to-day lives?  And shouldn’t all people really abide by these “unwritten rules”?  We are taught from a young age to be kind, to listen to other’s opinions, to think before we speak, so why is it that as soon as we are hidden behind a screen and a keyboard that we forget these guidelines apply and become trolls, argumentative or outright rude?  I think the most important thing is that we model our personal beliefs and values and model the

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Image via CCTV

ideologies that we would be okay with our students, our friends, and our families seeing and modeling too!  After all, that is our job and yes, sometimes it is hard to remain in this mindset in the heat of the moment, but these rules apply to the real world, why shouldn’t they apply to the online one too?


Week 5: Social Media and Its Potential to Build a Positive World

15 years ago, the world didn’t know Facebook and Twitter, it’s hard to imagine how fast the social media has developed over the time. It’s no doubt that since the booming of social media, the world has been connected and people are getting closer to each other than ever.

Social media has changed the world in the way it enables people to know what is happening in other parts of the world where few people are capable to travel there and see by themselves.  When the Harvey hurricane hit Texas, people around the world were watching constantly updated news on Facebook and Twitter, many people in the center of the hurricane used social media to inform their friends and families that they are safe and they shared the pictures their local area current situations. People from other parts of the world reached out to the hurricane’s victims via social media, they sent supplements, food, clothes, people also established many online donation lines via social media. With social media, people can discover mystery countries such as North Korea where only a few people have had the chance to actually go there and see, people are able to see the life of a place where they would never be able to go with the shared pictures on social media. Social media has also changed the world with its capacity to spread information. Local authorities use social media to inform their residents about emergencies, electricity cut, or community social events. In remote communities, social media acts as a tool for people to interact with outside world. Education makes a better world and online education through various social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter enable more and more people to access knowledge anywhere and anytime. My MEd – Educational Administration program used to be delivered in purely face-to-face format but it has just been transformed into an online program to accommodate students from across Saskatchewan, I have a classmate from Nunavut and she is able to take classes in the program thanks to the online format of our program.

Social media has many potentials in building a better world thanks to the speed of spreading information. Although there are still many people who still don’t use social media due to various reasons, unavailability of the Internet, lack of devices, personal choices…, in the future, I strongly believe that the number of people who use social media will dramatically increase. The more the number of people uses social media, the more we are connected to each other. 


Blast off!

Since I made the decision to change my project idea, I have been very eager to start the process of cross-stitching! So, after watching a cross-stitch tutorial for beginner’s video on YouTube, I was able to figure out the basic materials I need in order to get organized before actually learning how to cross-stitch. I recently went to Michaels and was able to find the materials I needed, and much more! I must say, I was blown away by the variety of fabrics, needles, threads, pattern books and embroidery hoops! I could have looked around for hours!

Here are the basic materials I picked up:

  • Aida fabric (14 count)
  • Tapestry needle (size 22)
  • Embroidery hoop
  • Scissors

After purchasing these materials, I realized that I was unable to purchase thread because I have not yet decided on a pattern!! I learned that there are a ton of thread colours available for cross-stitching and these threads are all colour coded! For instance, black thread is coded 310 and green thread is coded 701. At first, I was confused and didn’t understand why the thread colours were colour coded until I realized the threads are colour coded because they coincide with a specific pattern, similar to a map & legend. Therefore, I came back home with the 4 basic materials I purchased and began searching Google and Pinterest for some pattern ideas. Turns out, there are tons of patterns out there! Many patterns are available for purchase and many are free!! I briefly became overwhelmed as many of the patterns are clearly based upon experience level. Well, as a beginner I am looking for “beginner’s” pattern! So, the process of finding a pattern I feel capable of doing may take some time! After I have selected a pattern, I can purchase the appropriate thread colours I will be needing.

Although I am feeling somewhat nervous about getting started, I am still looking forward to this journey! Cross-stitching is a skill that may take a while for me to learn but I am ready to give it my best shot! So, wish me luck and stay tuned for some more progress!

Thanks for stopping by!


Making Mathematics simpler and joyful – magic math 2017-10-19 05:36:56

SQUARE ANY NUMBER USING VEDIC MATH

image via: Exam hot spot

Hello Everyone,

I hope you are having fun with math using Vedic mathematics technique, in my previous post we learned multiplication tricks and witnessed that how easily we can solve complex multiplication problems using Vedic math. Knowledge to execute fast mental mathematical calculation will help us enormously regardless of which field of life our deal with. The significance of these mental math tricks is that it will give us positive edge over others irrespective of whether we are a student or a teacher.

In this blog post, we will learn how to find a square of any number using Vedic math technique.

Now we will see the how we can implement Vedic technic and find the square of numbers ending with unit place digit as 5 (up to 95) in specific method.

Type 1: Square of any number with 5

                      252

1)2 is in ten’s place 5 is in unit’s place

2) Splits the digit

3) Tens place is 2 the next number of 2 is 3 multiply it i.e.2×3=6

4) Square of 5 is 25

5) Step 3 & step 4 together gives the final answer i.e.625

Type 2: Square of any number with 25

                             4252

1) Split two digits, hundred’s place 4 & ten’s and unit’s place is 25

2) Square hundred’s place i.e.42 = 16

3) Square of 252 = 625

4) Then divide 4/2=2

5) Add 16+2=18

6) Multiply 18 by 10 we will i.e. 18×10=180

7) Step 3 & step 6 together gives final answer i.e. 180,625

Type 3: Square of any number lies between (30-80)

                                     532

1)5 is ten place (Left side) & 3 is in unit place (Right side)

2) Consider the base, here 50 is nearest which can be taken as a  Power of 10

3) Deviate the Number i.e. 53= (50+3) (Base + n)

4) Take the half of the base and add the digit of deviation ‘n’ i.e. 25+3=28

5) Square unit place (Right side) i.e. 32=9, When we take square of right side, if we get  1-digit value then we have to consider the value as 0 & the digit hence the value will be   09

6) Step 4 & Step 5 together gives the answer i.e. = 2,809

Type 4: Square of any number to Base 100

                       982

1) Consider the base, here 100 is nearest base which can be taken as a power of 10

2) Deviate the number i.e. 98= (100-2) (Base-n)

3) Then 98-2=96

4) (n 2) i.e. 22=4, if we get 1-digit value then we have to consider the value as 0 & the digit then the value will be 04

5) Step 3 & step 4 together gives the answer i.e. 9604

Type 5: Square of any number near to Base n×100         

                                896 2

1) Consider the base, here 900 is nearest base which can be taken as a power of 10

2) Find the deviation for the given digits i.e. 8962= (900-4)2

3) We will split Base as (9×100 – 4) (n×100-n 1)

4) Multiply the given digit with n i.e. 896×9=8064

5) n×(-n 1) =9× (-4) =-36

6) Step 4-Step 3 i.e.8064-36=8028

7) Square n 1 i.e.42=16

8) Step 6 & Step 7 together gives the answer i.e. 802816

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Some of us might find it difficult when we just see these steps, with just a little bit of practice we can easily master these tricks and perform these simple math tricks in blink of an eye. In the below video I have solved few problems based on the above stated steps and I hope after seeing the video you find this technic simple and easy.

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