Summary of Learning ECI 831

Su "mmm mmm mmm mmm" ary of Learning ECI 831

The Caveat

Picturehttps://www.ccpa-accp.ca/the-medium-is-the-message/
​Marshall McLuhan often prefaced his ideas with a declaration caveat. He recognized that his prescience was limited to space and time. He declared that what he said/wrote/represented was a cumulative understanding of his experiences to that universal present. It wasn't a "way out", but an admission or recognition of -perhaps respect for - that moment in time and the understanding that he couldn't in fact predict the future. And to the delectation of several of his detractors, he didn't know with certainty what the end result of his assertions would be. I wish to invoke that caveat here.

Close, but no Cigar!!

Originally I wrote a summary of learning song ( and a guitar tab) to the tune of "Mmmm Mmmm Mmmm" by the Crash Test Dummies. It however didn't do two things for me. First it didn't explain -in content-  the depth of my understanding and it was difficult to discern if the "message" would be understood beyond the content. The second and probably the real reason - a failing really my own - the anxiety of performing it or having to play it in front of people while present. For these reasons I chose not to continue with it. Although, at some point I might addend this post and include it or keep it tucked safely into my back pocket.

I did however have fun writing and rehearsing the song, and playing around with camera and the editing elements in MovieMaker with my mentor -  part of my extended personal learning network. I will be advancing my knowledge of that program and devising its use in the very near future.. 
crash_test_dummies.docx
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And the Winner Is?

Picturehttps://crozdesk.com/providers/videoscribe
Instead I chose to use VideoScribe to present my summary of learning for EC&I 831. I chose VideoScribe over other formats like Powtoon for the aesthetic I felt I wanted. I have always enjoyed the white board videos from educational activists and was curious how they created them (in many cases they are actual video of people drawing on a white board).

VideoScribe had a delicious offer of a "free" 7-day trial subscription. How could I resist. It wouldn't be long, however, before I was purchasing a subscription to the site to use their software. The "free" version was extremely limiting, and therefore a commitment had to be made.

VideoScribe by Sparkol included documents and videos to guide users through their learning curve. I found these resources genuinely helpful in creating my first VideoScribe video. They not only explained how to create through the software tools, but what to include and why. I feel they did a good job not only creating but also packaging their product for usability.

Even with the subscription and the company provisos, there were still some short comings that I had to live with or resolve on my own. Firstly, not all images/animations were available with the subscription. There were free images/animations and then there were some you had to pay for - "premium" gifs. This was disappointing as I felt they should have come with the subscription. They weren't cheap either at $4.00 each I could see that using several of them would be costly (I did see a single image/animation for almost $30.00). Secondly, some of what I wanted to do, or needed to do was not explained by the company. I went to the Internet  and my personal learning environment (PLE) to scour for "How-to" videos. I came across several and was able to use the information to help create my presentation. Here is an example of one video I found really helpful. It explains how to sync audio in two different ways.

There were other great videos on setting camera scale and position and creating your own custom drawings (something I will explore further) that can really take your presentations to the next level.

It was helpful using the guide provided by VideoScribe to loosely storyboard the presentation before creating/recording. I feel with a few more presentations, I would be considerably more proficient with the tool and require much less time. All said my first VideoScribe took me roughly 10 hours to create - that does not include the story boarding or the "content" creation. It was however a worthwhile endeavor and much more fun while also more work than a short essay.

So without further adieu, my Summary of Learning for EC&I 831 2016.
Addendum - I want to make one clarification. In the video I state that Dave Cormier introduced us to Rhizomatic Learning and the idea of the "knowledge-able". We discussed it, but he didn't introduce it. The "Knowledge-able" belongs to Michael Wesch - from his TEDTalk "Knowledgeable to Knowledge-able". 

Major Digital Project Summary & Breakdown

Project Summary

Side-by-Side

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BEFORE
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AFTER

Top-to-Bottom

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BEFORE
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AFTER

Final Thoughts

This was an amazing project to complete, arduous and at the same time gratifying. It truly had it all - blood, sweat, and tears. In the end however, I can say I am proud of what I have completed. That it has been documented for posterity, if for nothing else, makes it particularly special.

I was supported through my learning environment and network of both online and offline experts, pseudo-experts, self-proclaimed experts, and amateurs - like me. Any question that came up, any product I was unsure of, any skill I didn't have, any technique that needed further explaining I was able to network the answer.

Now that it is complete, my hope is that  by posting it online I can also continue to curate my identity and reputation there. I want to reciprocate the support I received through the pictures, conversations, videos, literature, and testimonials. I believe I have created a legacy work - my online magnus opus - and it's my gift to you. 

Tags

#bathroom#renovation#craftsman#wainscoting#subway_tile#modern_rustic#schluter#lowes#home_depot#bennett_tack_cloth

Time Breakdown

I estimated at the beginning of the renovation that the project would take me roughly 100 hours. In actuality, it took closer to 150+ hours to complete the project. This time includes finding inspiration, creating, repairing, sourcing, shopping, decision making, and product returns. It does not include blogging, photographing, or drive time.

Cost Breakdown

Here is an approximate cost breakdown. I don't have all the numbers in yet, but will post actual spreadsheet when complete.

*Several Items I was able to salvage from the flood.

Flooring...$200
Waterproofing & Tile...$600
Shower Base and Door...$100 (this was for drain and lost door components. All over $1,000 new.)
Vanity & Quartz Top and Sink...$1,000
Taps...$10 (for fitting tape and ABS union.Taps $200 new.)
Paint...$100
Toilet...$10 (for the wax seal. Toilet $350 new.)
Lights...$200
Wainscoting...$200
Door...$150
Mirror...$80
Towel Bars...$0 (rescued from flood. $60 dollars new.)
(This estimate does not include mileage or many Subway sandwiches)

Total...$2,550


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Final Shots from the Entry.

Greatest Project Find​ - Special Mention

So through the course of acquiring tools and materials for the project I came across a wonderful product that I ended up using regularly throughout the renovation - so-much-so that I want to highlight it on here. Bennett Tack Cloth for professional finishing is essentially a tacky cheese cloth that "removes all surface contamination." I used it to wipe down my walls and wainscoting, counter, taps, mirror, shiny surfaces, tools, etc. On it's own it does an amazing job, in preparation for a cleaning product it is outstanding. There are inexpensive and go a long way. I highly recommend this product for your project.

Toilet

Toilet

Inspiration

I won't even go there:)

Resources

Most DIY stores produce literature and videos on how to use and install their products. Many of these resources are really good. This video, produced by HomeDepot, titled simply How to Install a New Toilet does a solid job giving you the low down.

Project Pictures with Caption

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The Toilet Flange Early in the Renovation.
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Removing the Old Wax Seal from the Toilet Flange.
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I Found Using a Putty Knife to be Effective for Removing the Wax Seal.
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Wax Removed. You Can See the Rubber Gasket Inside of the Wax.
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Plug the Plumbing with a Damp Rag to Prevent Sewer Gas from Escaping. There is no Trap to Block the Gas.
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With the Flooring down and the Flange Cleaned. Getting the new Wax Seal Ready. I Bought a Thicker Seal Thinking It would be Better on a Basement Floor.
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Too Thick. Worried About the Rubber Gasket Inside the Wax Holding Up the Toilet.
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Installed a Regular Wax Seal Instead. Here It Is, Centered on the Flange.
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Toilet Down. This is Easier With Two People. Took All of My Weight and Then Some to Get the Toilet Seated Tight.
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Going to Thread the Nut on the Bolt, and Tighten Clockwise to the Floor. Don't Forget the Washer.
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Supply Line and Braided Steel Connector. This isn't Actually the Correct One. It Was a Faucet Connection.
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Here is the Correct Line. Looks a Little Tight. I Might End Up Replacing this Line With a Slightly Longer Line.
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Bought a Small Water Leak Alarm in the Event this Baby Springs a Leak!
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Toilet with Rest of Bathroom.

Reflection

If you can, get someone to give you a hand lifting the toilet on and off of the flange. Don't hesitate to talk to a plumber if you are unsure. It is not difficult, but the last thing you want to end up doing is destroying the project you just nearly completed. I installed a water alarm for good measure just to give me a piece of mind for the next little while.

Waterproofing

Waterproofing

Inspiration

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http://www.ontariotile.ca/schluter-products.html

Resource

The Schluter website offers an indispensable library of instructional material to assist and expedite the use of their product. Their videos are posted on YouTube as well as many other helpful tutorials including this 55 minute time-lapse from Sal DiBlasi.

Project Pictures with Caption

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Taping the Shower Surround in Preparation for the Waterproofing.
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Using a Specially Designed, Coloured Adhesive for this Application.
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Kerdi-Bands that will Seal Seams and Joints.
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Troweling the Adhesive.
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Using a Prepared Premium Mortar to Adhere the Kerdi-Bands to the Kerdi-Board as per the Waterproofing Instructions.
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Mortar Troweled.
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Kerdi-band in Place, I Used a Wide Drywall Knife to Press Out any Air or additional Adhesive/Mortar.
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I Previously Cut Small Sections of Kerdi-band to Cover the Kerdi-board Hardware.
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Protect Your Base.
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Mortared and Knifed Seams...
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...and Hardware.
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Had to Cut Into the Kerdi-board to Fix a Loose Corner.
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Folding the Kerdi-band for Fitment.
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Mortared, I Knife the Middle and Draw Out from the Corner.
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I'm After Good Adhesion for Waterproofing.
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My Mortared and Beaded Shower Corner.
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Transitioning From Kerdi-board to Drywall with Kerdi-band and Mortar. This would be Problematic Later.
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Mortar Doesn't Sand Well.
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Happy With My Corners.
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Double Check Waterproofing.
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Makes Me Nervous, Checking and Double Checking. Hope it's Sealed.

Reflection

This part of the renovation is difficult and matched in complexity only with tiling. This is the foundation on which you will tile the shower, so you best get it right. Take the time, find the resources, watch the video, talk to the people who have used it before. It came on suggestion by contractors that I spoke to. It costs roughly 3 times as much as cement board, but I think it's worth it, especially for first-timers and inexperienced tilers. 

Lighting

Lighting

Inspiration

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http://wentworthavenuelighting.com/fixtures/blacker-house-mahogany-wall-mount-lantern/

Resource

If you're after Craftsman Style lighting, the Wentworth Avenue Lighting Library is the place to inspire your choices. There I found what I wanted and then hunted down something within my price range.

Project Pictures with Caption

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After Several Failed Attempts at Finding a Light I Liked, I Stumbled upon this Light from Homedepot. It is an Outdoor Light and should Work Well in a Wet Area.
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It had that Rustic Quality I was After.
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Lights on!

Reflection

There are so many places to buy good Craftsman Style lighting - many of them local. Buying local saves heavy delivery costs. Craftsman Style is currently quite popular. I really like the aesthetic, the history, and the authenticity for my bungalow.  The lights I purchased are outdoor lights and should function well in a wet area.

Painting

Painting

Inspiration

Picture
http://www.houzz.com/photos/897569/Historic-Craftsman-craftsman-bathroom-other-metro

Resource

His videos taught me everything I know about painting. He passed away in 2014 and is dearly missed. His website Lowepainting.ca is an indispensible site for all of your painting tips. He was featured heavily on Holmes on Holmes.

Project Pictures with Caption

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Lights Off and Covering on the Floor in Preparation for Paint.
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Brush Trimming the Corners.
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Trimming Around the Lights.
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Taped Off Where I Need a Nice Edge.
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Let's Roll.
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Going Grey!
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Final Product

Reflection

Painting is best when you commit to taking your time, being patient and following some good advice. I suggest using a good paint on primer. It may cost a little more, but it is worth it in the long run.

Summary of Learning Podcast

To share my summary of learning, I decided to give a podcast format a shot.  I love listening to podcasts and really appreciate the casual, natural conversation style of delivery they often offer.

I found myself really struggling throughout the course to hit publish and share my thoughts if they weren’t perfectly polished and to the highest degree of quality I could imagine. As I worked through my learning project and sharing the posts, I slowly let this go and started to just hit publish. It helped. But, I figured forcing myself to speak and listen and share in that way would really push me outside of my comfort zone.

Here is my attempt at turning this into a podcast. It ended up being longer than I had initially planned, but that’s okay – I’m hitting publish!

I used Audacity to edit and mix the sound together. After some searching around online, I found that there really aren’t many other options available for podcasts. Luckily once you get the hang of Audacity, it comes together pretty quickly. My editing consisted mostly of trying to time the intro and closing music, throwing in some transitions, and editing out as many “umms” as I could without completely wrecking the flow of the speaking. I wanted to do more voice modification work, but this proved to be pretty difficult. I found a tool called Voxal that I used to create the different voice I used in the intro, but it proved to be more work than it was ultimately worth. Here is a screenshot of the final file all thrown together.

audacitysummaryoflearningscreenshot

I found the intro music from a site called BenSound.com which has a whole bunch of other great tracks to use free of charge (creative commons license) and I recommend checking out the work there. After searching for way too long, I settled on the transition sound from FreeSound.org called “Movie Short Swell“. The rest was just me recording.

And, although the final product ended up being almost 9 minutes, I had at least 5 times that in raw recording that I ultimately cut down or re-recorded. The process really gave me a deeper appreciation for the work and skill that goes into both podcasts and radio shows. Audio is a difficult medium to work with. I found it much more difficult than video since you can’t just zoom back and forth – you have to listen to it as you progress to remember your spots.

Photo from UnsplashKai Oberhäuser

Vanity

Vanity

Inspiration
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INSPIRATION http://www.houzz.com/photos/5402695/St-Paul-Bungalow-Remodel-craftsman-bathroom-minneapolis
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http://www.smartgroupbuilders.com/Photos.php?gid=3&photoNo=10

Resource

I purchased the vanity that I used in the end from Lowes. Lowes has many videos online to help the average DIY'er. They do have a video on installing a bathroom vanity, but I preferred this video from Houseimprovement titled How to Install a Bathrooom Vanity. They also include a a video on installing the vanity top and plumbing the sink. It's a great all-in-one channel.

I didn't go with the IKEA cabinets for the bathroom because of the amount of customization required. They will be used elsewhere in the house. Ikea cabinets are awesome for anyone needing to do cabinetry with plenty of options to suit your design. Many of the high-end homes use Ikea cabinets.

Project Pictures with Caption

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Similar IKEA Kitchen Cabinets
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Door Panel Close Up
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Bought
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Layout
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Tools and Instructions
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Easy to Put Together
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Decided on a Different Vanity
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Bought White Quartz Vanity Top with Backspalsh
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Using a Silicone Adhesive to Secure the Quartz Vanity Top.
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I Was Told that Yellow Gas Fitting Tape is the Best Tape for Sealing Threads - Even on Plumbing.
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There is a Gasket on the Sink Drain, but I Figured a Little Plumbers Putty Couldn't Hurt. Be Careful, As I Have Read that Some Putty Can Stain.
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Water Supply Lines Connected. Make Sure You Have Hot to Hot, and Cold to Cold.
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Now to Figure Out This Gap in the Drain.
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I Decided to Cut From the Other Side of the Wall...
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...and Take Down the Burrs with Some Emory Cloth (Like Sandpaper).
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Applying the Oatey Generously.
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The Drain Matched Up to the Trap For a Smooth Flow.
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Wet Test the Work...A-Okay!

Reflection

The only reflection here is to get some help when moving around the vanity. Don't hurt yourself. The rest is actually "fun" work as you see almost immediate results. This is especially welcome after having long drawn out jobs, or product that requires curing.

Wainscoting/Board & Batten

Wainscoting/Board & Batten

Inspiration

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INSPIRATION
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Trying it Out In Store

Resource

I actually found I used more pictures and just time spent working out the wainscoting in the store. Physically being in-store  to realize the array of possibilities was helpful. My only suggestion is keep it simple, and try not to hog the whole aisle. Here is a good DIY 2 part video from Younghouselove to help you imagine your own project.

Project Pictures with Caption

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Decided to go with a Taller Wainscotting
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Putting the Primed Hardboard and MDF Trim in Place
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Capping the Top
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Cutting Around the Toilet Supply
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Nailed and DAP'd
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Had to Move the GFCI
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New Home Right Next Door
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Vanity In now Time to Trim Around
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Customizing

Reflection

If I were to do it again, I would take the extra time to make every cut as absolutely accurate as possible. Ultimately you'll end up using some DAP or filler depending on the look you are after. But the less you have to fill and sand the better. Again, keep it simple!